April 16, 2012 05:27

Not unlike their contemporaries in Cajun and zydeco music, Magos represents a generation of Hungarian folk musicians who are trying to keep the authentic folk music alive to pass it onto future musicians.

The Magos Hungarian Folk Band and their generation of folk musicians may be the last link who learned from the great masters of folk music who lived and preserved folk music for decades.

Sound familiar?

Magos will play authentic Hungarian folk music today, 7:30 p.m., at UL Lafayette's Angelle Hall, Room 153. A Hungarian Folk Dance workshop follows the performance. In addition, string musicians are invited to participate in a Hungarian music workshop Tuesday, 4-5:30 p.m., at UL Lafayette's Angelle Hall, Room 168.

Hungarian folk music, also called Táncház music, is from the Carpathian Basin which includes Hungary, Transylvania and part of Slovakia.

Not unlike their contemporaries in Cajun and zydeco music, Magos represents a generation of Hungarian folk musicians who are trying to keep the authentic folk music alive to pass it onto future musicians. The musical philosophy of Magos is to present Hungarian folk music in its archaic form and perform it to the younger generation.

The Magos band instrumentation includes two violins, viola, double bass, and cimbalom (a kind of hammered dulcimer).

As winners of the 2011 Budapest FOLKBEATS talent search competition, Magos is on a North American tour. Go here for more information on the group.